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Champagne

Champagne

Bottles per box
Bottle
Type of grape
Classification

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Champagne

 

It is a type of sparkling wine with its own Denomination of Origin. The name comes from the Champagne region, in northwestern France. In the fifteenth century it was already known by this name in Paris, although not in its region of origin where the term champagne designated uncultivated lands. During the seventeenth century the consumption of these wines became popular in the English and French courts thanks to the impulse of some families of this region.

 

Towards 1660, bottling began shortly before the first fermentation was finished, in order to preserve its aromas better, but as a result bubbles appeared, a source of concern for the producers who called it "vino del diablo" and "salta- plugs". If it were not for the popularity that this sparkling wine had in England, this form of production would have been abandoned.

 

Classification according to its sugar content:

The amount of sugar added after the second fermentation varies and determines the level of sweetness:

 

-Brut Nature (less than 3 gr. of sugar per liter)

-Extra-Brut (less than 6 gr. of sugar per liter)

-Brut (less than 15 gr. of sugar per liter)

-Extra dry (from 12 a 20 gr. of sugar per liter)

-Dry (from 17 a 35 gr. of sugar per liter)

-Semi Dry (from 33 a 50 gr. of sugar per liter)

-Sweet (more than 50 gr. of sugar per liter)

The most common is the brut, although throughout the nineteenth century and in the early twentieth century champagne and cava were generally much sweeter than they are today.

 

Classification according to their upbringing:

-Joven: from 9 to 15 months

-Reserva: from 15 to 30 months

-Gran Reserva: more than 30 months

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It is a type of sparkling wine with its own Denomination of Origin. The name comes from the Champagne region, in northwestern France. In the fifteenth century it was already known by this name in Paris, although not in its region of origin where the term champagne designated uncultivated lands. During the seventeenth century the consumption of these wines became popular in the English and French courts thanks to the impulse of some families of this region.

 

Towards 1660, bottling began shortly before the first fermentation was finished, in order to preserve its aromas better, but as a result bubbles appeared, a source of concern for the producers who called it "vino del diablo" and "salta- plugs". If it were not for the popularity that this sparkling wine had in England, this form of production would have been abandoned.

 

Classification according to its sugar content:

The amount of sugar added after the second fermentation varies and determines the level of sweetness:

 

-Brut Nature (less than 3 gr. of sugar per liter)

-Extra-Brut (less than 6 gr. of sugar per liter)

-Brut (less than 15 gr. of sugar per liter)

-Extra dry (from 12 a 20 gr. of sugar per liter)

-Dry (from 17 a 35 gr. of sugar per liter)

-Semi Dry (from 33 a 50 gr. of sugar per liter)

-Sweet (more than 50 gr. of sugar per liter)

The most common is the brut, although throughout the nineteenth century and in the early twentieth century champagne and cava were generally much sweeter than they are today.

 

Classification according to their upbringing:

-Joven: from 9 to 15 months

-Reserva: from 15 to 30 months

-Gran Reserva: more than 30 months